US Supreme Court to Decide: FBAR Penalty, $10K per Form or per Account?  

The US Supreme Court just agreed to resolve the split in the circuit courts whether the FBAR $10,000 civil nonwillful penalty is to be applied on a “per account” rather than “per form” basis.  By granting certiorari to Mr. Bittner, a taxpayer who petitioned the Court to review his case, we will finally have a … Continue reading US Supreme Court to Decide: FBAR Penalty, $10K per Form or per Account?  

Escaping the USA, Exit Tax and Transfer Tax Regimes: Using the “Dual National” Exception

Join me today in a live webinar: Everything you need to know about giving up a green card or US citizenship  - 2 CPE credits. Register here. The economy is not looking good with the stock market dropping sharply, with tech companies being hit most dramatically, dropping by about 40%.  Crypto markets are also in … Continue reading Escaping the USA, Exit Tax and Transfer Tax Regimes: Using the “Dual National” Exception

FBAR – It Gets You in the End, Presidential Pardon Notwithstanding

Can a presidential pardon forgive FBAR penalties?  Maybe Paul Manafort Jr. thinks so! Despite notice and demand for payment, he is not paying US$2.9 million in “willful” FBAR penalties assessed against him.  The US government just brought an action in the southern district court (West Palm Beach division 4/28/2022), to collect the outstanding civil penalties … Continue reading FBAR – It Gets You in the End, Presidential Pardon Notwithstanding

Recent FBAR Case: IRS Seeks “Willful” Penalty $8.8M Without Much Regard for the Facts

A very recent FBAR case teaches us a few things.  My colleague, attorney John Richardson, noted this after reading the case: "When charities need to raise money they will often have a bake sale or an auction. When the US government wants to raise money it uses an 'FBAR Fundraiser'". Readers, draw your own opinion! … Continue reading Recent FBAR Case: IRS Seeks “Willful” Penalty $8.8M Without Much Regard for the Facts

Oops… Made a Mistake on an FBAR?

The Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) contained in Title 31 of the United States Code, requires that every year US persons must report certain foreign financial accounts, such as bank accounts, brokerage accounts and mutual funds, to the Treasury Department and to keep certain records with regard to these accounts.  The reporting is done by filing … Continue reading Oops… Made a Mistake on an FBAR?

Part II: Biden Proposal Changes the Taxation Game for Gifts and Inheritances – Americans Abroad Hit Hard

Today's post, Part II, was written with my colleague John Richardson, J.D. Part I of this blog post discussed President Biden's Green Book proposal that would change the tax rules for unrealized capital gains when assets are gifted or passed at death.  To recap, the major thrust of the Green Book proposal is to treat gifts … Continue reading Part II: Biden Proposal Changes the Taxation Game for Gifts and Inheritances – Americans Abroad Hit Hard

“With Liberty and Justice (and Death Taxes) for All” …. Biden Proposal Changes the Taxation Game for Gifts and Inheritances (Part I)

Today's post is in two parts and was written with my colleague John Richardson, J.D. On March 28, President Joe Biden released the FY2023 Budget, also known as the Green Book, available here.   The Green Book is not proposed legislation, but it might be viewed as a kind of reading of the tea leaves showing … Continue reading “With Liberty and Justice (and Death Taxes) for All” …. Biden Proposal Changes the Taxation Game for Gifts and Inheritances (Part I)

Treasury Inspector General Says FATCA is a Big Fat Flop ….So Far

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) just issued a damning report on FATCA:  Additional Actions Are Needed to Address Non-Filing and Non-Reporting Compliance Under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (Report # 2022-30-019 4/7/22), available here. The TIGTA audit was undertaken to evaluate IRS efforts to actually use the reams and reams of … Continue reading Treasury Inspector General Says FATCA is a Big Fat Flop ….So Far

Tax Tips for the US Investor in a Foreign Start-Up: Convertible Notes

My earlier blog post, here examined some of the United States income tax consequences that could occur when a taxpayer mistakenly classifies an advance to a foreign corporation as a “loan” but that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) treats as a stockholding interest (“equity”) in the corporation. Two follow up posts, here and here examined the … Continue reading Tax Tips for the US Investor in a Foreign Start-Up: Convertible Notes